Category Archives: Gender-Based Violence

The Trouble with the Congo

I interviewed political scientist (and former aid worker)  Severine Autesserre about her new book The Trouble with the Congo for How We Got Here #53. She’s done some really interesting work on violence in Congo and the failures of peacebuilding there.

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How We Got Here #29

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New history podcast is up–long versions of my interviews this week with Haleh Esfandiari, author of My Prison, My Home and Peter Maass who wrote Crude World: The Violent Twilight of Oil.  There’s also an interview with the Canadian health care expert and former politician Roy Romanow on the origins of the Canadian system. Finally an excerpt that didn’t make it into the radio segment from my interview Tuesday with Anne-Marie Goetz of UNIFEM, The UN Development Fund for Women, about rape as a weapon of war.  I include it in the history podcast  because Goetz includes a great deal of historical perspective in answering the question of why it’s so urgent to address epidemic levels of sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict zones around the world.  More info on HWGH#29 at http://www.theworld.org/history as soon as I have time to post there.

Clinton in Congo

Here’s the piece I did for today’s show:

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Congo

More reporting on the rape issue this time by the excellent Stephanie McCrummen of the Washington Post.

The U.N. focuses on rape as a weapon of war

The UN Security Council held a debate on women and peace and security today at which UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon called for an independent commission of inquiry into the use of rape as a weapon of war in Chad, the DRC and Sudan. Just over a year ago the UN Security Council passed a resolution enshrining rape as a weapon of war as a threat to peace and security–the idea was to take the issue more seriously given the epidemic rates of sexual violence in conflict zones around the world. The resolution, 1820, mandated the UNSG to write a report laying out proposals for action to help prevent sexual violence and punish perpetrators. That report is now out and it includes the proposal for a commission of inquiry that would investigate crimes of sexual violence, identify those responsible and report back on what’s being done to ensure accountability. The report also raises the possibility of a new high level position on sexual violence at the U.N., an idea U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice endorsed in her remarks today.

Back to work

There’s a new episode of my history podcast up at The World’s website. Check it out: Moscow in 1993, revisiting the Taliban, finding out who Curtis LeMay was.

Lots on my mind–more apparent drone attacks still have me thinking about how bombing works/doesn’t work. I took out a whole pile of library books on the history of bombing which I look forward to perusing. Yesterday’s Jeffrey Gettleman NYT/IHT piece on male rape victims in Congo jolted me back to that topic too. Adam Hochschild has an overview of the Congo situation in the latest issue of The New York Review of Books which I found really helpful. It’s not getting better. I’ve got lots of news to catch up on from two weeks-plus vacation including this CNN report from last week on nursing in Malawi by Christine Gorman.

Conspiracy of Silence

UN meeting on tackling sexual violence in conflict–emphasizing importance of including women in peace deliberations.